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Archive for the ‘photography’ Category

Boris BikesWaiting - St. Pancras StationResting at the St. Paul's Cathedral GroundsThe canopy over St.Pancras StationSt Pauls Cathedral GroundsThe canopy over St Pancras station - the Barlow Trainshed
St Paul's CathedralSlices of the Cathedral.Slices of the Cathedral (St Pauls)Ruins of the old London WallLunchtime meeting - steps of the Royal Exchange, CornhillLunchtime taxi queue outside a popular eatery frequented by the corporate world.
Queen Victoria StreetAn ode to a friend - Kings Cross St PancrasPassengers at Kings Cross Station concourseCycles parked by a telephone boothNoble StreetLombard Street, City of London
Lombard Street, EC1Leadenhall Market, City of LondonLamb Tavern, Leadenhall MarketInside the Counting HouseFlowers at the StationFlorists at Kings Cross Station

LONDON – Various Shades, a set on Flickr.

Living and working in London often gets one into the drawl of things – complaints, whining, moaning – all about the weather, the journeys and everything that never seems right! – Story of an average Londoner.

Until, when one decides to give it a go and try capturing London’s various faces – and a different image emerges – medieval to modern to colourful to simply grey! Full of history, London amazes me!

Here is an attempt to capture sights as I see of the city. I will continue to update with fresh shots from time to time..

Cameras used – Canon EOS 5D and Fujifilm X E 1

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Happy Child! – Lagos

Originally uploaded by Mohul

Click here for a Nigerian journey through pictures of my travel into the interiors of the country – as a market survey project for FMCG goods the pictures portray various aspects of life and people’s buying habits. Places visited include – Lagos, Kano, Gusau, Funtua, Sokoto, Kebbe-Birnin, Katsina, Abuja, Suleja and Port Harcourt. All the pictures have been with my Blackberry and a very cheap and dated camera – so please pardon the quality. It is more about the pictures themselves and not technicalities!

Contrary to media reports and perceptions my experience was highly enriching and fascinating to say the least! Politeness, positivity, innovative ideas, smiling faces, diversity and a great zeal for life – not common in the Western world today, sums up what I encountered!

Great Country, Good People!

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Some kind of a rally talking about vegetarianism!

Originally uploaded by Mohul

Florence was our base for a tour of the Tuscan region this July. We stayed in a leafy northern suburb apartment amongst the Florentines.

Trips to the local grocers and fresh market componded the charm of the holiday with local wines atnig ht as part of our routine.

Walking through the arterial roads of the old city and absorbing the sites was not very difficult. The most difficult part was to capture the sights. The dilemma was ‘to click or not to click’. Th easiest way to see pictures of Florentine monumnets is once again a book or the internet – even flickr itself has a few hundred dedicated posts on the city.

I have tried to go off the beaten track and presented here a few glimpses of the city in its various moods as various times of the day.

Here you will see high noon, low light , the sun setting on Florence and a few night shots of the capital of Tuscany.

Florence, epicentre of the Rennaissance, the city that recognised the greats of Vinci, Michelangelo, Giotto, Machiavelli and Boticelli, banished Dante and housed the Medici family for centuries – I was there!!!

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A Hotel Transit Boat

Originally uploaded by Mohul

This was my second visit to Venice in 9 years but a rushed one again…….reached around midday and soaked in 7 hours of Venetian bliss….after a sumptuous lunch and a few beers the Gondola ride through the canals exposed me to the ‘backstreets’ of this 1700 year old floating paradise!

Once again, what you see here is through my eyes and through my craving for colour and texture.

I am as usual bessotted by the Venetian masks – something gorgeous and naughty about them!

The selected pictures can be seen by clicking the following link:
VENEZIA 2009
Enjoy and comment!!

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On the 64th year after the Red Army liberated Auschwitz and Birkenau concentration camps in Poland, the debate is:

Should we preserve the crumbling remnants and artefacts of automated murder – one of mankind’s most dastardly acts in recent history

OR

Should we let it die its own death? As historian Robert Jan Van Pelt says that once the last survivor has died it should be left for nature to reclaim, and eventually forgotten.

Work Will Set You Free

Work Will Set You Free

The issue is : the museum at Auschwitz employs 250 staff and does not have enough money to protect or maintain the buildings, contents and the site as a whole from disintegrating. Till date the Polish government has provided for more than 90% of the funds and the rest has come from the world over. But is it Poland’s responsibility alone?

Between the Fences at Auschwitz I

Between the Fences at Auschwitz I

The camp at Auschwitz I was built on former Polish cavalry barracks and therefore has stood the test of time. On the other hand unlike all things German, Auschwitz II or Birkenau was not built to last, and the extremities of nature on this open flat landscape has ultimately taken its toll. Camp I although sturdy, still faces challenges – it has two tons of human hair (women’s) that was ‘sheared’ to be sent to factories in Germany, to weave linings for the SS jackets – without further care, the hair will soon crumble to dust. There are items in the collection which are old, yet relate to our daily lives – tooth brushes, hair brushes, watches, spectacles, shoes, clothes, prayer towels, paintings, certificates, ID cards – in fact everything one needs in their daily lives. And this is what makes the pain so real.

25000 Shoes - One Day's Collection

25000 Shoes - One Day's Collection


I can only opine on the basis of what I saw at these camps ,as a tourist, and do not intend to restate the obvious that the world already knows – although to mention that more than 1.1 million children, women and men were butchered in these two camps in 4 years, can only remind us of the precise and clinical execution of man’s hatred of fellow beings.
Krematorium I - Gas Chamber

Krematorium I - Gas Chamber


The fact that every country in Europe had someone dying in these camps, makes it the EU’s responsibility to ensure the preservation. Why doesn’t the EU sometimes look more closely at things like this and not bother so much about the hours in our working week in England?

On the other hand, the museum does not have any entrance fee and depends solely on contribution from group tours, parking, sale of books and grants. Why shouldn’t we pay to enter this monument? Would the world really lose interest in Auschwitz on a £10 admission fee?

Its £22.50 to get into Madame Tussaud’s in London!!!!

Public Toilets - No Place to Hide Human Shame

Public Toilets - No Place to Hide Human Shame

How can we let it disintegrate? These structures allow us to honour the pain and sufferings of the millions. The complex is a monument of people’s courage in despair and with the world being able to pay tribute, we can restore the dignity of these millions, that was snatched away by the guards of the Third Reich.

Through The Barricades

Through The Barricades

We still have some survivors from the holocaust who fulfill the testament of the victims and convey to subsequent generations the truth about those days.

But the moment when there will be no more eyewitnesses left is inexorably approaching. What remains is the belief that when the people are gone, “the bricks will cry out”.

All the pictures are from my own photographic work. (c) 2006 – 2009 Ari Sengupta

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“With more than half a century of camera work behind him, Ansel Adams stands as one of America’s greatest landscape photographers. His career is punctuated with countless elegant, handsomely composed, and technically flawless photographs of magnificent natural landscapes. No contemporary photographer equaled the lifetime contributions of Ansel Adams in bringing public recognition of the art of photography or taught so widely the techniques of black and white photography. His strength as an artist is largely attributed to his tireless investigation of the methods of photography, developing a careful darkroom technique of exposure and development he called the Zone System. Striking photographs of Yosemite and the surrounding the Sierra Nevada capturing the elusive visual myth and mood of these wild places became the wellspring of Ansel Adam’s consciousness and brought him widespread popular acclaim. His intimate understanding as well as passion for conservation of this pristine wilderness gave Ansel Adams the energy and tenacity needed to bring subjects to life for a wider public. His reputation has been firmly established by exhibitions in virtually every major American art museum, three Guggenheim Fellowships and a score of publications.”

I had my first taste of Ansel Adam’s work on a recent visit to the “Georgia O’Keeffe and Ansel Adams: Natural Affinities” exhibition at the Smithsonian American Art Museum , Washington D.C., where the two artistes stood on common ground – O’Keeffe’s paintings versus Adams’ Photographs. It was an amazing experience and an inspiration. The above photograph is my tribute to Adams. I was visiting the Natural Bridge in Virginia on Christmas eve, and the creek was frozen in sections. These fallen leaves under the ice looked happy to be there, or were they crying to break free?!

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