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Posts Tagged ‘photography’

It’s that time of the year when another holiday beckons – this one had been on the cards for a long time. Our 10 days in Argentina and Brazil in 2005 was just a taster of the real thing, as we realised how thinly we scrapped the surface with barely any time spent in both the countries.

Ever since, the desire to go further in the continent has been lurking, it needed a plan and some resource to make it a reality. And so it is, just another few days to go for that long awaited tour. Our final itinerary includes ‘top to toe’ of Chile and the Argentine Patagonia.

The Whole Length of It

The Whole Length of It

However, this time I wish to share our experience in this diary on a day to day basis with a few pictures if possible, depending on the internet availability in wilderness. But I will surely catch up whenever base camp allows.

And so, inspired by the Motorcycle Diaries, this will be a humble attempt to journalise our experience in this exotic land, but ofcourse without using Ernesto’s and Alberto’s ‘magic formula‘ for a survival!

The itinerary roughly includes:

  • 2 nights in Santiago de Chile
  • 2 nights in San Pedro de Atacama ( Atacama desert)
  • 1 Puerto Natales
  • 2 nights Torres del Paine national park
  • 2 nights Perito Morino glacier (Argentina)
  • 1 nights El Calafate (Argentina)
  • 2 nights Bariloche (Argentina)
  • 2 nights Puerto Varas and Chiloe
  • 2 nights Valparaiso

This day by day account will under Chile & Patagonia, and I look forward to your reactions and questions. The ultimate purpose is to entice you on a similar journey!

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Wheel House
This was my third trip to the Broads…..and as usual the place still holds a lot of excitement for me.Chugging along in our own motor cruiser -the Malibu Light, miles and miles of gentle waterways glistening in the sunlight with the peaceful Norfolk countryside as far as the eye can see – it was sheer bliss for 3 days.

Our Shelter for Two Nights

Our Shelter for Two Nights

Relaxing as we listened to the water lapping against the stern and looking out for moorhens stirring in the rushes, it was a welcome break. We visited the nature reserves and explored some pretty villages and medieval ruins on the way. The sumptuous barbecue at our mooring in Gayes Staithe one afternoon was an experience, and we did it so well for 14 people – pros.

Rest of teh time we literally whiled away the hours watching the serene countryside and settled down with a glass of wine as the sunlight slowly faded away…….it was then time for dinner and the kitchen on the cruiser served its purpose…..no complaints!

At Salhouse Broads

At Salhouse Broads

The Norfolk Broads is now the UK’s largest nationally protected wetland and an important area for wildlife. The Broads were formed when people dug for peat in Medieval times and then they were later flooded. The Victorians used them for transporting heavy loads but nowadays they are here purely for pleasure and passengers are the boats’ main cargo.

Sunset from our mooring

Sunset from our mooring

A holiday in the Norfolk Broads is like a whole new world. And it’s easy. No complicated locks to manoeuvre, just 125 miles of navigable waterways with plenty of places to moor up and hop out to explore pretty villages and market towns, or to stop at a welcoming pub to set up for the rest of the day.

This time it was with family and we had a ball.

Highly recommended.

Click here for my photostream of tthe Broads.

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SIENA



CLICK HERE FOR SIENA PICTURES

Originally uploaded by Mohul

On a very sunny and warm Sunday in July we left Florence (Italy) early and drove around the Chianti countryside stopping over at interesting market towns of Greve in Chianti and Castellina in Chianti, just in time for lunch in the medieval town of Siena.

What you see here are things in my perspective – meanwhile, for all other touristic sights you could visit thousands of pages on the internet or buy a respectable travel guide that will prepare you for a visit.

Here I want to share glimpses of texture, colour, moods and the ambience of these places as I saw and loved!

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A Hotel Transit Boat

Originally uploaded by Mohul

This was my second visit to Venice in 9 years but a rushed one again…….reached around midday and soaked in 7 hours of Venetian bliss….after a sumptuous lunch and a few beers the Gondola ride through the canals exposed me to the ‘backstreets’ of this 1700 year old floating paradise!

Once again, what you see here is through my eyes and through my craving for colour and texture.

I am as usual bessotted by the Venetian masks – something gorgeous and naughty about them!

The selected pictures can be seen by clicking the following link:
VENEZIA 2009
Enjoy and comment!!

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On the 64th year after the Red Army liberated Auschwitz and Birkenau concentration camps in Poland, the debate is:

Should we preserve the crumbling remnants and artefacts of automated murder – one of mankind’s most dastardly acts in recent history

OR

Should we let it die its own death? As historian Robert Jan Van Pelt says that once the last survivor has died it should be left for nature to reclaim, and eventually forgotten.

Work Will Set You Free

Work Will Set You Free

The issue is : the museum at Auschwitz employs 250 staff and does not have enough money to protect or maintain the buildings, contents and the site as a whole from disintegrating. Till date the Polish government has provided for more than 90% of the funds and the rest has come from the world over. But is it Poland’s responsibility alone?

Between the Fences at Auschwitz I

Between the Fences at Auschwitz I

The camp at Auschwitz I was built on former Polish cavalry barracks and therefore has stood the test of time. On the other hand unlike all things German, Auschwitz II or Birkenau was not built to last, and the extremities of nature on this open flat landscape has ultimately taken its toll. Camp I although sturdy, still faces challenges – it has two tons of human hair (women’s) that was ‘sheared’ to be sent to factories in Germany, to weave linings for the SS jackets – without further care, the hair will soon crumble to dust. There are items in the collection which are old, yet relate to our daily lives – tooth brushes, hair brushes, watches, spectacles, shoes, clothes, prayer towels, paintings, certificates, ID cards – in fact everything one needs in their daily lives. And this is what makes the pain so real.

25000 Shoes - One Day's Collection

25000 Shoes - One Day's Collection


I can only opine on the basis of what I saw at these camps ,as a tourist, and do not intend to restate the obvious that the world already knows – although to mention that more than 1.1 million children, women and men were butchered in these two camps in 4 years, can only remind us of the precise and clinical execution of man’s hatred of fellow beings.
Krematorium I - Gas Chamber

Krematorium I - Gas Chamber


The fact that every country in Europe had someone dying in these camps, makes it the EU’s responsibility to ensure the preservation. Why doesn’t the EU sometimes look more closely at things like this and not bother so much about the hours in our working week in England?

On the other hand, the museum does not have any entrance fee and depends solely on contribution from group tours, parking, sale of books and grants. Why shouldn’t we pay to enter this monument? Would the world really lose interest in Auschwitz on a £10 admission fee?

Its £22.50 to get into Madame Tussaud’s in London!!!!

Public Toilets - No Place to Hide Human Shame

Public Toilets - No Place to Hide Human Shame

How can we let it disintegrate? These structures allow us to honour the pain and sufferings of the millions. The complex is a monument of people’s courage in despair and with the world being able to pay tribute, we can restore the dignity of these millions, that was snatched away by the guards of the Third Reich.

Through The Barricades

Through The Barricades

We still have some survivors from the holocaust who fulfill the testament of the victims and convey to subsequent generations the truth about those days.

But the moment when there will be no more eyewitnesses left is inexorably approaching. What remains is the belief that when the people are gone, “the bricks will cry out”.

All the pictures are from my own photographic work. (c) 2006 – 2009 Ari Sengupta

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